PMO (640x376)The point of  a PMO (Project Management Officer) is to have somebody responsible for all of the actions a company does in project management. The PMO makes sure Project Manager (PM) practices are consistent and there is the right balance of relationship management and technical management. Are we cutting to the chase at the right times, digging deeper at the right times and having a consistent approach to client focus while getting the product right throughout the organization?

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3 budget monitoring strategies to help predict the unpredictableBudget monitoring for innovation projects

As a junior technical project manager, my job is to support senior project managers by monitoring and controlling longer-term projects with large teams. I also manage shorter-term projects with smaller teams. During my first year at StarFish Medical, I have worked on over ten projects with a wide variety of technical focuses and team compositions. I collect and maintain data on project budgets, schedules and tasks in order to help our teams predict and respond to challenges.

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interview process _q7a4201-800x533The interview process was surprising to me when I applied to StarFish Medical for an administrative role six years ago. I was brought in for two rounds of interviews. In years past, I had only ever had a single interview with a company before being offered a position. Looking back on that now, I was naïve in believing that the company knew enough about me, and in turn, that I knew enough about them to accept a position.

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dreamstime_xs_11990740 medical device PCB prototypeDesigning a printed circuit board (PCB)? Is it for a prototype? I’m a Junior Electrical Engineer at StarFish Medical. This article summarizes some of the things that I’ve learned since I’ve been here. It is intended to serve as some words of advice to the novice PCB designer. The focus is on medical device PCB prototypes, but some of the information here is also applicable to more mature designs. For more PCB design best practices, check out these blogs from Kenneth MacCallum.

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dreamstime_xs_27707049From form studies to functional components at the early stages of prototyping to full production, the applications for 3D printed parts are growing rapidly. Parts designed in 3D modeling software can be transferred and quoted by a 3D printing company almost instantly. Many 3D printing companies return parts to the designer within 24 hours. This decreases timelines for the overall design iteration process, as verification of components is performed promptly upon receipt of parts.
What processes are available and what are their relative merits? Several techniques are employed at commercial scale.  In this blog I outline and compare three of the most commonly used in medtech product development.

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Medical device comfort on a cold winter’s day

medical device comfort
When you climb into bed at night and wrap yourself up in a nice warm blanket, you’re comfortable, right? What happens if it’s really hot and humid out and you’re trying to get some sleep… probably not so comfortable anymore!
Comfort is subjective. There are thousands and thousands of permeations in nearly any situation that can cause comfort or discomfort and any rating in between. These include mental, physical and temporal demands multiplied by your own performance, frustration and the amount of effort required.

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